Pro Off-Season Training Camp

Participants in 2010

Jason Hirsh
New York Yankees

Ryan Platt
Milwaukee Brewers

Evan Anundsen
Milwaukee Brewers

Graham Miller
Los Angeles Dodgers
Chris Seddon
Seattle Mariners

Ryan Tacker
Free Agen

James Darnell
San Diego Padres

David Iden
Los Angeles Dodgers
 
Mike Montgomery
Kansas City Royals

Justin Page
Free Agent

Anthony Bass
San Diego Padres

Scott Lonergan
Pitching Coach
 

Participants in 2009

Daniel Belind
MInnesota Twins

Frank Pfister
Atlanta Braves
 
Mike Montgomery
Kansas City Royals
 
Jake Dittler
Free Agent
 

Participants in 2008

Daniel Berlind
Minnesota Twins

Jeremy Plexico
Washington Nationals

Paul Coleman
L.A. Dodgers

Andrew Bailey
Oakland Athletics

Keith Ramsey
Free Agent
 
Brok Butcher
L.A. Angels

Ryan Paul
SF Giants

Justin Segal
N.Y. Yankees

J.D. Martin
Cleveland Indians

Tyler Arneson
Cincinnati Reds
 
Matt Hirsh
Colorado Rockies

Clint Evert
Washington Nationals

Darric Merrell
Colorado Rockies

Justin Klipp
Chicago White Sox
 

Participants in 2007

Errol Simonitsch
Minnesota Twins

Colin Balester
Washington Nationals

Matt Hirsh
York Revolution, Atlantic League

Rocky Collis
Free Agent

Andy Grahame
Colorado Rockies
 
Jason Hirsh
Colorado Rockies

Kody Evans
Arizona Diamondbacks

Brok Butcher
Los Angeles Angels

Clint Everts
Washington Nationals

Ryan Paul
San Fransisco Giants
 
Scotty Beerer
Colorado Rockies

Steve Kahn
Seattle Mariners

Paul Coleman
Los Angeles Dodgers

Matt Falk
Tampa Bay Devil Rays

Jeremy Plexico
Washington Nationals
 

Participants in 2006

Barry Zito
Oakland Athletics

Errol Simonitsch
Minnesota Twins

Kody Evans
Arizona Diamondbacks

Trever Bell
Anaheim Angels

Brian Finnegan
Cleveland Indians

Mike Nickeas
Texas Rangers
 
Jeff Bruksch
Cincinnati Reds

Matt Hirsh
Houston Astros

Derek Bonds
Free Agent

Scotty Beerer
Colorado Rockies

Kody Haerther
St. Louis Cardinals
 
Jason Hirsh
Houston Astros

Steve Kahn
Seattle Mariners

Mike Rogers
Oakland Athletics

David Weiner
Free Agent

Mike Nesbit
Seattle Mariners
 

Participants in 2005

Barry Zito
Oakland Athletics

Errol Simonitsch
Minnesota Twins

Mark Rogers
Milwaukee Brewers

Mike Nickeas
Texas Rangers
 
Chris Seddon
Tampa Bay Devil Rays

Jason Hirsh
Houston Astros

Scotty Beerer
Colorado Rockies
 
Jeff Bruksch
Cincinnati Reds

Reid Harvey
Free Agent

Colin Balestar
Washington Nationals
 

Participants in 2004

Erik Hiljus
Oakland Athletics

D.J. Houlton
Houston Astros

Jo Jo Reyes
Atlanta Braves

Dustin Cupper
Cincinnati Reds

Greg Miller
Los Angeles Dodgers

Matt Clanton
Chicago Cubs

Daric Barton
Oakland Athletics
 
Chris Seddon
Tampa Bay Devil Rays

Errol Simonitsch
Minnesota Twins

Anthony Lunetta
Cleveland Indians

Reid Harvey
Houston Astros

Brian Pilkington
Los Angeles Dodgers

Matt Montgomery
San Francisco Giants

Jordan DeYoung
Toronto Blue Jays
 
Ryan Wing
Chicago White Sox

Jason Hirsh
Houston Astros

Raphael Rogueiro
San Francisco Giants

Mike Burns
Houston Astros

Matt Montgomery
Houston Astros

Josh Cowles
Anaheim Angels

Vince Cordova
New York Mets
 

Participants in 2003

Erik Hiljus
Oakland Athletics

Scott Rice
Baltimore Orioles

Josh Karp
Montreal Expos

Ryan Wing
Chicago White Sox

Kirk Saarloos
Houston Astros

Matt Clanton
Chicago Cubs

Alex Merricks
Minnesota Twins

Victor Hall
Arizona Diamondbacks

John Henry Williams
Northern League
 
Barry Zito
Oakland Athletics

Jeff Bruksch
Oakland Athletics

Mike Wodnicki
St. Louis Cardinals

Greg Miller
Los Angeles Dodgers

Joel Zumaya
Detroit Tigers

Matt Montgomery
San Francisco Giants

Jason Allec
Detroit Tigers

Bryce Terveen
Atlanta Braves
 
Glendon Rusch
Milwaukee Brewers

Chris Seddon
Tampa Bay Devil Rays

Jake Woods
Anaheim Angels

Ryan Mills
Minnesota Twins

D.J. Boulton
Houston Astros

Brian Lockwood
Tampa Bay Devil Rays

Kody Haerther
St. Louis Cardinals

Paul Chiafretto
Toronto Blue Jays
 

Participants in 2002

Erik Hiljus
Oakland Athletics

Scott Rice
Baltimore Orioles

Tannner Eriksen
Arizona Diamondbacks

Josh Karp
Montreal Expos

Ryan Wing
Chicago White Sox
 
Barry Zito
Oakland Athletics

Jack Krawzcyk
Milwaukee Brewers

Jeff Bruksch
Oakland Athletics

Justin Miller
Toronto Blue Jays

Mike Wodnicki
St. Louis Cardinals
 
Glendon Rusch
Milwaukee Brewers

Matt Harrington
San Diego Padres

Geoff Blum
Houston Astros

Chris Seddon
Tampa Bay Devil Rays

Jake Woods
Anaheim Angels
 

Jaeger Sports offers a 6 week training program each year (January/February) prior to the beginning of Spring Training.

This training program addresses three major areas: 1) Arm Strength and Conditioning, 2) Stretching and Flexibility, and 3) The Mental Approach to Baseball or Mental Training. Of these three areas nothing is more important than mental training, and it is the central theme throughout the camp.

Professional Off-Season Training Programs (January and February)

Pitchers Itinerary
Yoga
Mental Training
Arm Strength Throwing Program
Mound Work/Drills/Bull-Pen
Cardiovascular

Hitters Itinerary
Yoga
Mental Training
Arm Strength Throwing Program
Drills/Mental Approach/Live Hitting
Cardiovascular

Baseball players tend to excel in practice due to the absence of consequences and the nature of its stress-free environment. However, once the season begins and the consequences increase (i.e. statistics begin to count) players tend to put a great deal of pressure on themselves. This mind-set will often cause players to perform inconsistently because their actions become mechanical, their mind, tense.

Take a slump for example. Players tend to forget that slumps are almost always mental. Day in and day out pitchers just don't forget how to pitch, hitters don't just forget how to hit? Maybe once in a while players will make mechanical adjustments but the majority of the time it's the players mental approach (clarity of mind, being relaxed, inner trust) that causes poor physical results. This again is the result of the player not having any mental training or skills to fall back on (even though the physical skills have been ingrained since an early age).

Are professional off-season program will allow you to perform consistently by teaching you how to eliminate the distinction between “practice” and “performance”. By developing a consistent attitude and approach during your work-outs, you will begin to understand that your approach to game situations doesn't have to change just because the circumstances may change. Our work-outs are so process oriented you will find that *whatever* area of your game that you are working on (stretching, throwing, hitting, mechanics, drills), a high level of concentration will always be demanded. By staying in the process of your work-out you will learn the importance of physical and mental attention. It is through this quality of attention in all situations that ultimately carries over into game situations.

Arm Health/Strength Throwing Program

Jaeger Sports takes arm strength and conditioning very seriously. We know from experience that once a player has arm problems (chronic pain, inflammation, injury), his career is immediately put into jeopardy. Plain and simple - a baseball player is dependent upon the longevity of his arm. Granted, though some position players “get by” with adequate arms in the short run, all players must come to the realization that the development, care and conditioning of their arm can make or break their career. As you will see we have a lot to say about arm strength and conditioning - it is the one of the major staples of our training program.

The two most important areas covered throughout the throwing program are Arm Health and Arm Strength. More specifically, players will go through a systematic throwing routine (long toss) to build up the strength and stamina of their arm. These exercises are designed to balance the functions of the large and small muscle groups. Unfortunately, most baseball players work only the large muscles and forget that injuries usually occur when the smaller muscles, ligaments and tendons break down. Once again, our primary goal is to educate and instruct each player how to stretch, strengthen and condition their arm. Our secondary goal is help each player develop a consistent release point through proper rhythm and balance. These exercises will ultimately lead to increased velocity and accuracy and will address the needs of both pitchers and position players.

Long Toss
At the core of our throwing program is Long Toss. Long Toss is a systematic throwing routine that is the single most important work-out for any baseball player concerned about among other things, the strength of their arm and the longevity of their career. Our Long Toss is based on two key principles - throwing through a “stretch” and staying mechanically sound. This will serve four major purposes: 1) Health - stretch and strengthen the smaller muscles of the arm, 2) Velocity -establish arm speed and finish, 3) Accuracy - develop a consistent release point, 4) Rhythm - sound and more fluid throwing mechanics. Each of these areas will be developed as players learn that there is a major distinction between “playing catch” and playing Long Toss.

Long Toss and Pitchers
Because mechanics, release point and arm speed are such a major part of pitching we use our Long Toss program to work on these areas. More specifically, pitchers will be in a mechanically sound position on every throw. As pitchers learn how to stretch out (distance) correctly they will learn the importance of staying relaxed in their balance point. As pitchers learn how to pull down “through their stretch”, they will learn how to create a consistent release point without decelerating. This is the key to developing a consistent release point and generating arm speed. The consistency of a release point becomes even more crucial when we move on to our next drill, Grips and Rotation. This is because the consistency of off-speed pitches being in the zone are based on the ability to “finish” through your release point, and not decelerating.

Mound Work (Pitchers)
Immediately following our long toss work-out, pitchers will begin to work on a number of different drills. Each drill is designed to address two major areas: mechanics and release point. Because each Major League Organization has their own way of teaching mechanics our emphasis and approach has more to do with establishing a rhythm within those mechanics. We will make adjustments if necessary, but our philosophy is rather simple - if a pitcher can repeat a rhythm (like a dance), then there is a great likelihood that his wind-up will be fluid, which in turn leads to a consistent balance point and release point.

Other physical drills include “hip drill”, “grips and rotations”, “chest/knee”, “foot work” and “balance”; Mental drills include demeanor/body language (imagery), pitching lanes (visualization), bull-pen pace, sequencing/pitching philosophy, holding runners.

Hitting (Hitters)

*The Art of Hitting*
Immediately following your long toss work-out, you will go through a number of drills that include soft toss, tee work, visualization and live hitting. What makes these drills unique is that we key into you mental, as well as your physical approach to hitting. Since almost all hitting slumps are mental slumps (i.e. most hitters rarely change mechanics during the season) we have found that learning how to have a quiet and clear mind is critical to succeeding in game situations. Learning how to swing at strikes and take balls is an art. Learning how to keep a consistent frame of mind from at-bat to at-bat is an art. Learning how to track balls while staying relaxed and balanced is an art. Learning how to hit in pressure situations is an art. Hence, we emphasize building a process and approach that is an art that will allow you to express your talent, rather than inhibit your talent, from at-bat to at-bat.

*Trusting Your Approach*
Hitting is an “expression” of your talent. Therefore we address your approach to hitting rather than your actual hitting mechanics. Again, each organization will have their own philosophy to hitting so it is our goal to teach hitters how to maximize their mechanics by having a consistent mental approach. Specifically, we address patience, discipline and pitch selection - three areas that are often overlooked when hitters swing without a purpose (both in practice and game situations). These drills are designed to keep a clear mind, to see the ball long, stride softly and learn how to key into your hitting zones. In addition, these drills will teach you how to keep a consistent approach, regardless of the circumstances (bases empty or bases loaded).

Because you have your own unique approach to hitting, our goal is not *necessarily* to change your mechanics but polish them through a more relaxed and fluid approach. This will ultimately help solidify your mechanics in game situations, when it counts.

Cardiovascular Conditioning
Because players spend four to five weeks getting into “shape” during spring training, we don't *limit the amount* of cardiovascular conditioning in January and February. However, we do implement a number of running exercises to enhance leg strength, agility, ballistic movement (foot speed) and endurance. Because the season can be very long, our goal is to provide exercises that are “energizing”, so all players show up to spring training refreshed, and have the ability to maintain this energy level throughout the duration of the season.

A Final Word on our Professional Training Program

Because our professional program lasts either six weeks (Major League Camp) or eight weeks (Minor League Camp) we are afforded the time to ingrain a specific mind-set *or process* that will serve as a foundation throughout the entire season. And because this routine is as much mental as it is physical it will enable you to rely on your mental skills, not just your physical abilities. Because our training is centered around an intimate mind/body connection you will find that this connection will sustain itself throughout the season. Naturally, this leads to mental and physical consistency - the ultimate goal of any athlete.

Is there anything getting in your way of realizing your maximum potential Let's face it -- there are a lot of talented players who know how to showcase their talents during practice but find it difficult to let it happen between the lines, in game situations, when it counts. A lot of these players have the physical abilities to become successful Major League players but are unable to maintain a level of consistency from game to game, pitch to pitch; from the practice field to the playing field.

There are many factors that can affect a player's mental approach, including distractions, pressure, consequences and negative thoughts. Any one of these can cause even a “mentally strong” player to perform below his capabilities.

You obviously possess the physical talents necessary to succeed at the Major League level. Then, what is preventing you from realizing your potential? From being as mentally consistent as you are physically prepared?

It is my belief that the mind is the missing link between having potential and realizing this potential. If you sense that your mental skills are not as reliable as your physical skills - if you feel that you are not as relaxed, focused, concentrated, disciplined or confident as you would like to be, I hope you will consider this an opportunity to incorporate these skills into your development as a complete player.